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King Uzziah
Amos 1:1 In the days of Uzziah King of Judah
 
Uzziah Tablet
The Uzziah tablet resides in the Israel Museum.
 
King Uzziah Tablet
The tablet warns not to open the grave. Uzziah was struck with Leprosy according to the Biblical text.
 
 
 
History
Uzziah of Judah was the king of the ancient Kingdom of Judah, and one of Amaziah's sons, whom the people appointed to replace his father. He is one of the kings mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew.

His long reign of about fifty-two years was "the most prosperous excepting that of Jehoshaphat since the time of Solomon." He was a vigorous and able ruler, and "his name spread abroad, even to the entering in of Egypt" (2 Chr. 26:8, 14). In the earlier part of his reign, under the influence of Zechariah, he was faithful to the Lord and "did that which was right in the sight of the Lord" but toward the close of his long life "his heart was lifted up to his destruction," and he wantonly invaded the priest's office (2 Chr. 26:16), and entering the sanctuary proceeded to offer incense on the golden altar. Azariah the High Priest saw the tendency of such a daring act on the part of the king, and with a band of eighty priests he withstood him saying, "It appertaineth not unto thee, Uzziah, to burn incense." Uzziah was suddenly struck with leprosy while in the act of offering incense and he was driven from the Temple and compelled to reside in "a several house" to the day of his death (2 Chr. 26:3).
 
 
The Uzziah Tablet
In 1931 an archeological find, now known as the Uzziah Tablet was discovered by Professor E.I. Sukenik of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The Funerary Inscription of King Uzziah was found in the collection of the Russian Convent on the Mount of Olives, but there is no record of the place from which it was removed. The Aramaic inscription is incised on a stone tablet (35 x 34 cm.) and the style of the script dates it to the latter part of the Second Temple period. It tells of the reburial of the remains of Uzziah, King of Judah (733 BCE)

Inscription on the Uzziah Tablet:
"Hither were brought the bones of Uzziah King of Judah and do not open"
 
 
Scriptures
2 Chronicles 26:23 So Uzziah slept with his fathers, and they buried him with his fathers in the field of the burial which belonged to the kings; for they said, He is a leper.

Isaiah 6:1
In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.

Amos 1:1 The words of Amos, who was among the herdmen of Tekoa, which he saw concerning Israel in the days of Uzziah king of Judah