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Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser
2Kings 17:3 Against him came up Shalmaneser king of Assyria
 
The Obelisk of Shalmaneser names the Biblical King Jehu. The obelisk resides in the British Museum.
 
Bronze band from the gates of the palace of Shalmaneser III. British Museum.
 
The Kurkh Monolith of Shalmaneser names King Ahab.
 
Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser
The "Black Obelisk" of Shalmaneser III (reigned 858-824 BC) is a black limestone Neo-Assyrian bas-relief sculpture from Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), in northern Iraq. Currently displayed in the British Museum. It is the most complete Assyrian obelisk yet discovered, and is historically significant because it displays the earliest ancient depiction of an Israelite.

It was erected as a public monument in 825 BCE at a time of civil war. It was discovered by archaeologist Sir Henry Layard in 1846.

The obelisk features twenty reliefs, five on each side. They depict five different subdued kings, bringing tribute and prostrating before the Assyrian king. From top to bottom they are: (1) Sua of Gilzanu (in north-west Iran), (2) Jehu of Bit Omri (ancient northern Israel), (3) an unnamed ruler of Musri (probably Egypt), (4) Marduk-apil-usur of Suhi (middle Euphrates, Syria and Iraq), and (5) Qalparunda of Patin (Antakya region of Turkey). Each scene occupies four panels around the monument and is described by a cuneiform script above them.

The second register from the top includes the earliest surviving picture of an Israelite: the Biblical Jehu, King of Israel. It describes how Jehu brought or sent his tribute in or around 841 BCE.

Jehu severed Israel’s alliances with Phoenicia and Judah, and became subject to Assyria. The caption above the scene, written in Assyrian cuneiform, can be translated:

"The tribute of Jehu, son of Omri: I received from him silver, gold, a golden bowl, a golden vase with pointed bottom, golden tumblers, golden buckets, tin, a staff for a king and spears."

For more on "Son of Omri" see the Moabite Stone

 
 
The Kurkh Monolith
The Monolith is an Assyrian document that contains the Battle of Qarqar at the end. The Monolith stands some 2.2 metres tall and roughly covers years one through six of the reign of Assyrian King Shalmaneser III.

Inscribed on the Monolith is a reference to King Ahab who contributed 2,000 chariots and 10,000 soldiers to an alliance of kings that was attempting to resist the conquering armies of Shalmaneser.
 
 

Scriptures
2 Kings 17:3 Against him came up Shalmaneser king of Assyria; and Hoshea became his servant, and gave him presents.

2 Kings 18:9 Shalmaneser king of Assyria came up against Samaria, and besieged it.

2 Kings 9:13 Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is King.

2 Kings 8:26 Two and twenty years old was Ahaziah when he began to reign; and he reigned one year in Jerusalem. And his mother's name was Athaliah, the daughter of Omri king of Israel.